Chief Financial Officer / Controller

We are starting a confidential search for a CFO / Controller. Our client is a privately-held $150M company in the south metro Atlanta area. We are looking for an “all-around athlete” who is equally comfortable working with the CEO on financial strategy and working with the accounting team on day-to-day operations with his or her sleeves rolled up.

The successful candidate would oversee all typical responsibilities of a CFO / Controller including: strategic and financial planning; forecasting and budgeting; general ledger, reporting, and treasury; compliance and controls; risk management; business development; and project management.

» Since this is a confidential search, we are not able to share the precise industry, but we can share that automotive experience would be a big plus.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and seven years’ experience. MBA, CPA a plus.

Reply: Please email your cover letter (with compensation requirements) and résumé.

  • Please list the industries you have worked in so we can easily spot qualified candidates.
  • Must be free and clear to work in the USA for an indefinite period.
  • Equal opportunity / affirmative action employer.

And forward this to friends who may be interested. Thank you.

# # #

Human Resources Manager

We are starting a confidential search for an HR manager.Image result for human resources icon

Responsibilities: The successful candidate will oversee HR for a site with 50-100 employees. He or she will manage two people. This small team will be in charge of full lifecycle HR including payroll, compensation, benefits, recruitment, hiring, training, performance management, and termination.

» Since this is a confidential search, we are not able to share the industry.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree, or combination of education and experience; 10 years in HR; SPHR, PHR, or SHRM CP preferred; experience with a foreign-owned company preferred.

Reply: Please email your cover letter (with compensation requirements) and résumé.

  • Please list the industries you have worked in so we can easily spot qualified candidates.
  • Must be free and clear to work in the USA for an indefinite period.
  • Equal opportunity / affirmative action employer.

And forward this to friends who may be interested. Thank you.

# # #

Where Do People Yearn to Work?

What are the most sought-after jobs in America, and what makes them so desirable? Today, LinkedIn released its list of the 2017 Top Companies in the country. “This is a list of companies where we know people want to work,” said Dan Roth, LinkedIn Editor in Chief, during an interview on CNBC.

The 50 organizations were selected based on analysis of data from LinkedIn’s 500M+ members. “Many of the companies on the list…are brands we know, like, and often even love,” says Business Journalist, Suzy Welch. “This is not where people like to work, it’s where they yearn to work.”

So what are the qualities of these most desirable companies? Some are predictable – flexible work hours, a diverse workforce, innovative office environments, generous family leave and vacation time (many even have dog-friendly offices).

But Roth says there’s something more in the data. “What we see constantly is that people want to work at places where they can take on hard problems.”

Jobseekers are looking for opportunities to learn new ways of thinking and address important issues and causes. Today’s workers want to be part of something significant and challenging. And the companies they yearn to work for are those where they can collect experiences to push them to the next level in their career.

To learn more:
The 25 hottest companies in America, according to LinkedIn
LinkedIn’s top companies of 2017 reveal what employees really want
LinkedIn Top Companies 2017: Where the world wants to work now

The top 25 companies on the LinkedIn list:

25 – Capital One
Diversified banking company
24 – Adobe
Global leader in digital media/marketing solutions
23 – Stryker
Global medical technology company
22 – BlackRock
Investment firm and the world’s largest asset manager
21 – JLL
Professional services and investment management firm with a focus on real estate
20 – JPMorgan Chase & Co.
A leading global financial services firm
19 – Visa
Global payments technology company
18 – CBRE
The world’s largest commercial real estate services and investment firm
17 – Twitter
Social media platform available in over 35 languages with 316 million monthly active users
16 – Under Armour
Producer of specialized performance athletic apparel
15 – Workday
A leading provider of financial management, human capital management, and analytics applications
14 – Dell Technologies
An end-to-end computing solutions company
13 – McKinsey & Company
Global management consulting firm
12 – Netflix
The world’s leading Internet television network
11 – Airbnb
A community marketplace for individuals to list and book unique accommodations around the world
10 – Comcast
A global media and technology company
9 – The Walt Disney Company
Entertainment company producing films, television, sports coverage and theme park attractions
8 – Time Warner
Global leader in media and entertainment including television networks, film, and TV
7 – Apple
Pioneer in personal technology including computers, phones, software applications and platforms
6 – Tesla
Producer of electric vehicles and renewable energy generation and storage
5 – Uber
A transportation network company that operates car and food delivery mobile apps
4 – Salesforce
Producer of social and mobile cloud technologies
3 – Facebook
Social media and social networking service with 1.9 billion users each month
2 – Amazon
An electronic commerce and cloud computing company offering merchandise and entertainment to clients around the world
1 – Alphabet
Parent company of Google, a multinational technology company specializing in internet services and products

A Proven Process

Sadik Habach

Super proud of Sadik. He came through his transition process with flying colors. This is a note he wrote to his HR director to say “thanks.”

– – – – –

I would like to take a moment to share with you my experience with O’Farrell Career Management for the last few months and how much they have helped me as outplacement consultants during my separation process.

They are professionals with many years of experience. The have a proven process to prepare professionals in identifying strengths and opportunities about their careers when phasing out of the difficult situation of being unintentionally separated from an employer. Dave and Stephannie cover with their process all the necessary areas including résumé preparation, market exploration, networking and behavioral interviewing, among others. All these areas really work, based on my own recent experience!

On the personal side, Dave is always there to talk to you about the program and any difficult situations you may be facing. He is a well-prepared career coach and a really nice guy. I’d encourage you to continue relying on his services when you need an outplacement consultant again.

Thanks for your time. Have a great day!

– Sadik Habach

Why You Should Never Miss an Opportunity to Network

Never pass up an opportunity to network


Never pass up an opportunity to network

I learned a valuable lesson on the second day of my own job search many years ago about why you should never miss an opportunity to network. I’d just been liberated by my employer of 13 years and was feeling all the emotions we usually feel as we face an uncertain future: anger at my old boss, hurt feelings about leaving the company, and fear about paying the mortgage and other bills.

Lucky for me, my wife worked for one of the world’s three largest career management firms. My company didn’t have the vision or caring to provide outplacement service, so I was very fortunate to receive these career management services pro bono. My second day there, we had a champagne celebration for a fellow job seeker who’d just landed a job. About 40 other seekers, consultants and staff members gathered in the conference room to hear his story.

BTW, they really did serve champagne – along with orange juice and mimosas.

 

The Assembly Line Versus the Corner Office

The lucky seeker thanked everyone for their help and then proceeded to tell us that he’d been searching for 18 months (or 30 months; I remember my heart sinking and my stomach churning as he said “something-and-half years”). Then he told us he did what his career coach told him to do. He networked. He networked some more. And then still more.

He reached into a catalog case and pulled out a three-ring binder with three-inch rings. He held it up chest high and dropped it on the conference table. Some of us jumped as the thud reverberated through the room.

“Friends this notebook is one of three notebooks I made during my search. It contains hand-written notes from all of my networking calls. I had a very short list of ‘A’ contacts that I called every week. I had ‘B’ contacts I called once a month. I had a long list of ‘C’ contacts I called once a quarter. I also told everyone I met about my job search. People in my neighborhood. Friends at my country club. Even people in line at the grocery store.”

“I told everyone I could think of and everyone I could find – except for one person.”

“Several weeks ago I was sitting in the bleachers at my son’s basketball game. I noticed I was sitting next to the only parent on the team I hadn’t told. I was sure a factory worker like him couldn’t help a guy like me because I was the general counsel of an Atlanta-headquartered firm.” He let that sink in a moment and then restated, “He worked on an assembly line and I worked in a corner office.” Another pause. “Finally I swallowed my pride and summoned my courage and told him my story. To my amazement he said, ‘I know someone who might be able to help you.’”

“Friends, I stand before you today because I got out of my own way and told someone who makes a fraction of what I make about my job search. Never pass up an opportunity to network.”

We cheered while he held up the champagne cork and dropped it in a large goblet with dozens of other corks.

 

Why You Should Never Miss an Opportunity to Network

During his remarks, he said the position was created for him. Many years later it dawned on me that he and his family missed a tremendous amount of income because of his pride. Let’s say his cash compensation was $240K per year. If he had that conversation at the beginning of the basketball season, say three months earlier, his pride cost him $60K. If he’d had the conversation 18 months prior, his pride cost him $360K.

Here’s the bottom line. It’s usually hard, if not impossible, to monetize what a weak résumé, a poor strategy, or a bad attitude costs a job seeker. In this case pride was costing this gentleman more than $4600 per week. In business, we call this “opportunity cost.”

What is your opportunity cost per week? What barriers are standing between you and a new job? What are you doing to knock those barriers down? And who do you need to meet with to discuss your job search? Who have you left out?

Take action today to shorten your search, earn more money, and get better results.

– Dave O’Farrell